Do’s and Don’ts for Boomers Living in Sin

canstockphoto15145120 Senior Couple on beachAfter a divorce, many Baby Boomers swear they will never marry again. Then they fall in love. In a previous post, Boomers: In your next relationship just shack up, I listed the financial incentives that are fueling the surge in seniors shacking up together. In this post, I will share tips on how to handle your finances when living in sin.

 

Share Household Expenses? Definitely

Many divorces are sparked by the inability to talk openly about money. In your post-divorce relationship, don’t fall into the same trap that got you into that divorce. Make it a priority to go over the money situation once a month. Share the household expenses equally or proportionately based on your respective incomes. Here’s where that joint account comes in handy to pay the bills. You each deposit your share of money to cover expenses and pay for them out of the joint account.

When I say “household expenses”, I am not talking about improvements to the house; fund those by the person who owns the house. Sharing in the cost of remodeling or major repairs can get complicated when one of you passes away first without clearly covering this situation in the estate planning documents. Again, I can refer you to excellent estate planning attorneys in the Brazos Valley.

Mingle Assets & Debt? Nope

When shacking up together, retain separate checking accounts. One joint account is fine as long as you also have your separate account. Do not apply for a joint credit card. Do not comingle debt.

Do not contribute toward the purchase of a major asset that is titled to your partner. Talking about houses, vehicles, boats, airplanes and investment accounts. Ok, if you just have to contribute, be sure your name is also on the title. If you are leasing an abode, get both your names on that lease. No exceptions. Consult with an estate planning attorney. Ask me for the best ones in the Brazos Valley. Do not get yourself into the pickle of co-owning a house with your partner’s mother after your partner tragically and suddenly drops off the perch.

Get a No-Nup? Yep

Ok, it might not be romantic, but get a no-nup anyway. This is a legal document that addresses property division, financial support and debt planning for the possibility that your relationship ends prior to either of you passing on. You want to be clear what will happen to your assets if and when the relationship ends. It is not a DIY project. You will need a family law attorney, so call me if you want recommendations.

 

Boomers: In your next relationship just shack up

canstockphoto22699599 Happy Older Couple In Park

  It used to be called living in sin. It is now socially acceptable and growing by leaps and bounds among boomers. Shacking up is a popular alternative to marriage and divorce, even a nice collaborative divorce. Older people are living together for an average of nine years. Financial reasons top the list of incentives. […]

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3 Most Common Questions about Divorce and Retirement

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Happy Retirement?

Boomers who are considering divorce are typically worried about their long-term financial security. They  are starting to think about retirement and are usually concerned about whether they will have enough money to be happy in retirement. Here are some pointers for a happy retirement. Contemplate your goal of retirement. Is it to have money and […]

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Four Reasons to Have Not-Alimony

Most people think alimony has to be tax deductible for the payor and taxable income for the recipient. Actually, you can elect to have not-alimony. So why would you want to do that? When the recipient is in a higher tax bracket than the payor. The payor will not get a tax deduction because of […]

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